How to Deal with Menopausal Night Sweats

A guest post from Tara Hardin (LadyCare Menopause Ltd) talking about night sweats associated with the menopause.

Hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating) is a condition that is often associated with night-time hot flushes in menopausal women. It is an irritating problem that can keep women awake all night long. Fortunately, there are various ways of dealing with it.

What are menopausal night sweats?
Night sweats are the body’s reaction to the hormones released due to the perimenopause or menopause. Sweating can also accompany hot flushes during the day.

What happens when you experience night sweats?
Night sweats cause your body to perspire profusely while you sleep. In addition, it is not uncommon for you to experience a cold sweat when you wake up. The severity of these symptoms can vary; some women suffer badly, while others barely notice them at all.
Unfortunately, the night sweats often result in women dreading going to bed as they fear the problem will affect their own health as well as their relationship with their partner.

Why do night sweats happen during the menopause?
Even if you keep the windows open or turn up the air conditioner, night sweats can still occur. This is yet another side effect of the menopause. When your ovaries stop secreting hormones, it is a sign that you are going through ‘the change’. Due to the reduction in hormones, your body has difficulty regulating heat, which in turn causes the night sweats and hot flushes.

How to prevent or reduce night sweats
Here are some quick tips that can help prevent you from having an uncomfortable night:

● Turn on the fan or lower the temperature on the air conditioner
● Don’t use blankets or sheets
● Wear light or cool nightclothes
● Take sips of cold water
● Relax your body by meditating – slow down and deepen your breathing

To reduce the frequency of the night sweets, consider the following advice:

● Alleviate any stress by performing calming exercises before you go to bed
● Daily exercises can also reduce stress and help you enjoy a long and peaceful sleep
● Maintain a healthy weight
● Avoid eating spicy food and don’t drink alcohol or caffeine
● Avoid unhealthy habits, such as smoking

Maintaining a balanced diet with lots of healthy food can provide long-term solutions to your night sweats. Studies have shown that a daily intake of one or two servings of soy can reduce the occurrence and intensity of your symptoms.

While supplements have shown mixed results, many women find them helpful in relieving menopausal symptoms, especially night sweats. However, make sure you consult a doctor before you take any supplements as they may cause side effects or interact poorly with the medication you are already taking. Here are the most frequently used vitamins and supplements:

● Vitamins B and E
● Flax seeds in their natural form, capsules or oil
● Primrose in capsules or food-grade oil

Another way of combating night sweats and hot flushes involves hormone replacement therapy (HRT). However, exercise caution when opting for this treatment. If possible, try to take the smallest dose and for the shortest time possible. Acupuncture may also be beneficial.

Conclusion
There is no standard relief for night sweats. A method that works for one woman may not be suitable for another. It is a good idea to keep a record of the treatments that help alleviate your own particular symptoms. You should also understand that finding an appropriate treatment regime can take time. And remember, always consult a doctor before taking any supplements, even herbal ones.

Hyperhidrosis Research Network Newsletter

The Hyperhidrosis Research Network has been established to bring together people with hyperhidrosis, healthcare professionals and researchers so we can:

  • Share new research developments and how you can get involved
  • Publicise hyperhidrosis in the media and help to remove misconceptions about it
  • Develop an advocacy group so our voices are heard when decisions about being made by the NHS etc.

The first Newsletter can be downloaded by clicking on the image above or by clicking here.

If you would like to get involved please contact the group by email: [email protected]

 

Please help a high school student

Hello, my name is Ava from the United States. I am a high school student researching how hyperhidrosis affects the lives of patients. My interest in this subject is inspired by the fact that I suffer from hyperhidrosis and would like to communicate with an audience which shares my circumstances. All responses are completely anonymous.Thank you so much for your time. To take part in the survey click here or use the link below:

https://forms.gle/hdtvkiQWSr7UXQxS8

Are there any Pro-patients out there?

What is a Pro-Patient?

A patient/ friend or family member of a patient or patient advocate who takes on a leadership role in helping those with a medical condition.

What does a Pro-patient do?

A Pro-patient might organise support groups, advocate for individual patients and even advance treatments and help organise care by establishing and running professional organisations.

How do I get involved

Any Pro-patients out there? We’re looking to facilitate peer to peer and specialist to patient information exchange and support. www.health-shared.com was created to allow you to make and share content with the wider healthcare community.

Join us by signing up at www.health-shared.com

Contact Us

We have been experiencing some problems receiving messages from the Contact Us page over the last few weeks (End of September/early November 2019).

If you have recently sent a message but received no response, please would you complete the form on the Contact Us Page again.

Thank you. 

Do you have a skin condition that you want to change?


Katie at TwoFour has got in touch with us about a new BBC Three series focusing on skin conditions. The show offers people the chance to see experts, possible treatment and to have a chat about their skin conditions.
If this is up your street and sounds like something you or a family member or friend may be interested in applying for please follow / pass on this link: https://b1.etribez.com/ag/twofour2/skin/welcome.html

Patient needs and access to care

A European study is looking at patients’ with skin diseases access to care and their needs. Hyperhidrosis is classes as a skin condition and we know access to care in the NHS in the UK varies according to where you live. Please read the message below and complete the short survey via the link below.

Dear patients,

The Fondation René Touraine – FRT, is a European non-governmental, non-profit organization whose purpose is to support therapeutic
progress in dermatology through actions bringing together
dermatologists, scientists, pharmaceutical companies and health
authorities. The FRT is financially supported by the EADV – European
Academy of Dermatology and Venereology to conduct a qualitative study
about patients’ needs.

Therefore, we would need your opinion about the quality of care you received,
the access you have to verified information and also general information on a casual day with your
skin disease and on the unmet needs your encounter. The goal of this study
is to approach patients’ reality in todays’ healthcare system.
We have set up a secured link where you can answer our questions
anonymously. The data is collected and analyzed by the Fondation René
Touraine.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PGWXQLC

Thank you for your help!
The Fondation René Touraine’s Team

Research Priorities Set

The Hyperhidrosis Priority Setting Partnership has surveyed more than 250 patients and clinicians, including nurses, GPs and dermatologists, to identify research priorities for the future. The results are now published and the top ten priorities are:

  1. Are there any safe and effective permanent solutions for hyperhidrosis?
  2. What is the most effective and safe oral treatment (drugs taken by mouth) for hyperhidrosis?
  3. What are the most effective and safe ways to reduce sweating in particular areas of the body (e.g. hands, feet, underarms, face, head etc.)?
  4. How does hyperhidrosis affect quality of life?
  5. Are combinations of different treatments more effective than one type of treatment for hyperhidrosis?
  6. What is the most safe and effective treatment for mild to moderate hyperhidrosis?
  7. Could targeted therapies or biologics (e.g. antibodies, hormones, stem cells), be effective in treating hyperhidrosis?
  8. What is the most effective severity scale that can be used to determine if a person is eligible for hyperhidrosis treatment?
  9. What is the safest and most effective surgery for hyperhidrosis?
  10. How safe are hyperhidrosis treatments at different stages of life, e.g. childhood, pregnancy and breastfeeding?

Read the press release here.